30-DAY ULTIMATE ITALY TOUR

From Rome, the Eternal City to the stunning landscapes of Umbria and Tuscany. Florence, the cradle of Renaissance, the scenic Cinque Terre and Lake Como, then magic Venice. The spectacular coasts of Amalfi and Sorrento and finally Matera with its unique sets. The ultimate tour for those who passionately love Italy.
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HIGHLIGHTS:

  • Rome with the Coliseum and Imperial Forums, Caesars and gladiators
  • The Vatican with the Basilica of St. Peter, Popes and power
  • Orvieto and Civita, the cities “on the rocks”
  • Assisi, the birthplace of St. Francis
  • Umbria, the green heart of Italy
  • Val d’Orcia, the perfect blend between man and nature
  • Siena and San Gimignano, power in the Middle Ages
  • Florence, an open-air museum
  • Pisa, how can it stand?
  • 5 Terre, the stunning 5 villages perched on the rocks
  • Parma, the art of food
  • Milan, the 2,000-years-old vibrant capital of Northern Italy
  • Lake Como, a scenery for movie lovers
  • Venice, the wealthiest city of the Middle Ages
  • Alberobello, living in Trulliland
  • Matera, the city of stone
  • Paestum, when Greeks ruled Italy
  • The coasts of Amalfi and Sorrento, where divas are at home
  • Pompeii Archeological Area, a Roman city fixed in lava
  • Castelli Romani, where Romans enjoy life

WHAT'S INCLUDED:

Accommodations with Continental Breakfast:

  • Days 1 & 2: 3* to 5* Hotel in Rome city centre
  • Day 3: 3* to 5* Hotel in Orvieto city centre
  • Days 4 & 5: 3* to 5* Country House in Assisi area
  • Days 6 to 8: 3* to 5* Country House in Val d’Orcia area
  • Days 9 & 10: 3* to 5* Hotel in Florence city centre
  • Days 11 & 12: 3* to 4* Hotel in Cinque Terre area
  • Days 13 & 14: 4* Historical Palace in Parma
  • Days 15 & 16: 3* to 5* Hotel on Lake Como
  • Day 17: 3* to 5* Hotel in Verona city centre
  • Days 18 & 19: 4* to 5* Hotel in Abano Terme
  • Days 20 & 21: in Venice city centre
  • Day 22: 3* to 5* Masseria Country House in Andria area
  • Days 23 & 24: Trullo house in Alberobello
  • Day 25: 3* to 5* Hotel in Matera city centre
  • Days 26 to 28: 3* to 5* Hotel on the Amalfi Coast
  • Day 29: 3* to 4* Hotel in Castelli Romani area
  • Day 30: 3* to 5* Hotel in Rome city centre

Activities and transfers:

  • Day 1: 6-hour private walking tour of Classical and Baroque Rome with an Authorised Tourist Guide, including admission to the Colosseum and the Imperial Fora Archeological Area – Aperitivo on a Roman Terrace
  • Day 2: 3-hour private walking tour of Vatican City with an Authorised Tourist Guide, including admission to Vatican Museums and Sistine Chapel – Free time
  • Day 3: Transfer to Orvieto – Stopover in Civita di Bagnoregio - Tour of “Orvieto underground”
  • Day 4: Visit of an organic farm with lunch near Todi - Transfer to Spoleto – Free time – Transfer to Assisi
  • Day 5: 2-hour private walking tour of Assisi with an Authorised Tourist Guide - Visit of an Artisan Ceramics Laboratory in Deruta
  • Day 6: Transfer to Val d’Orcia - Visit of a Brunello Winery in Montalcino area with tastings
  • Day 7: Full-day private tour of Val d’Orcia with an Authorised Tourist Guide: Pienza and Bagno Vignoni – Visit of a Pecorino cheese laboratory in Pienza with tastings
  • Day 8: Tuscan Cooking Class at your accommodation
  • Day 9: Full-day private tour of Siena & San Gimignano - Transfer to Florence
  • Day 10: 3-hour private walking tour of Florence with an Authorised Tourist Guide, including Admission to Galleria dell’Accademia with Michelangelo’s David – Free time
  • Day 11: Transfer to Cinque Terre - Stopover in Pisa - Free time
  • Day 12: Full-day private Boat Tour with lunch on board OR Full-day free tour by public train of Cinque Terre area
  • Day 13: Free time - Transfer to Parma area
  • Day 14: Half-day private tour of Parma area with an Authorised Tour Guide, including visits to a Parmesan Cheese factory and a Parma Ham factory – Parmesan Cooking Class in a villa near Parma
  • Day 15: Transfer to Lake Como area – Stopover in Milan – Free time
  • Day 16: Full day tour of Lake Como area, including admission to Villa Carlotta in Tremezzo
  • Day 17: Transfer to Verona - 2-hour private walking tour of Verona with an Authorised Tourist Guide - Visit of a wine cellar in Valpolicella with tastings
  • Day 18: Transfer to Strà – Free visit of Villa Pisani – Transfer to Abano Terme
  • Day 19: Free time at the Thermal Baths at your Hotel in Abano Terme
  • Day 20: Transfer to Venice - 3-hour private walking tour of Venice city centre with an Authorised Tourist Guide, including a gondola ride
  • Day 21: Half-day boat tour to Murano and Burano – Free time
  • Day 22: Transfer to Venice Airport - Domestic Flight to Bari – Transfer to Andria – Stopover at Castel del Monte
  • Day 23: Transfer to Alberobello - Stopover in Martinafranca – Free time
  • Day 24: Full day tour to Lecce area - 3-hour private walking tour of Lecce city centre with an Authorised Tourist Guide
  • Day 25: Transfer to Matera - 3-hour tour of Matera city centre with an Authorised Tourist Guide
  • Day 26: Transfer to the Amalfi coast - Stopover in Paestum - Private walking tour of Paestum Archeological Area with an Authorised Tourist Guide – Visit of a Buffalo Mozzarella farm with tastings and light lunch
  • Day 27: Full day tour of the Amalfi Coast - Stopovers at Amalfi, Positano and Ravello
  • Day 28: Full day round trip to Capri by public jetfoil OR Full-day private Boat Tour to Capri island
  • Day 29: Transfer to the Castelli Romani area - Stopover in Pompei - 2-hour private walking tour of Pompei Archeological Area with an Authorised Tourist Guide
  • Day 30: Full-day tour of Castelli Romani area – Visit of a Frascati wine cellar with tastings - Transfer to Rome city centre

Admission Tickets to:

  • Colosseum and Imperial Fora Archeological Area in Rome
  • Vatican Museums and Sistine Chapel in Rome
  • Orvieto Underground in Orvieto
  • Galleria dell’Accademia in Florence
  • Villa Carlotta in Tremezzo
  • Villa Pisani in Strà
  • Paestum Archeological Area
  • Pompei Archeological Area

Optional pick ups and drop offs at Airports / Railway Stations

All transfers by private car / minivan

Meals upon request – List of selected restaurants along the itinerary

Full assistance 24 hours/day by our Back Office

DAY 1 – rome

Benvenuti in Italia per il tour dei vostri sogni, welcome to Italy for the tour of your dreams.

Here you are in Rome, a place where ancient history, excellent art and religious icons mix in a unique blend! Start from the 2,000-year-old Colosseum, the most famous amphitheatre in the world, and the Imperial Forums, the administrative and monumental centre of the Roman Empire. On the Palatine Hill, the grandiose ruins of the Palaces of Augusto, Tiberius and Domiziano still dominate the Circus Maximus valley, 50-meter-high structures giving a unique view of the city.

Walking from the Colosseum to Piazza Venezia, on your right you may reach the Church of San Pietro in Vincoli, hosting the famous Michelangelo’s sculpture of Moses.

From Piazza Venezia, you will head inside “Baroque” Rome, starting with the Pantheon, dedicated to the worship of every god (Pan-every Theon-divinity), now the memorial chapel of great Italian people of the past. After that, don’t miss the Church of St. Louis of the French, famous for the cycle of paintings of the great Caravaggio at the end of the 16th century. Then Piazza Navona, a splendid oval area corresponding to the underground Domitianus’ Stadium, with the gorgeous Fountain of the Four Rivers by Lorenzo Bernini in the centre of the Piazza. And finally Fontana di Trevi, the biggest and most famous fountain of the city, a Rome icon known all over the world: here statues of travertine marble stand over the cliff and the wide basin, in an epic representation of the Kingdom of the Oceans.

At the end of the day, just sit down at a local "trattoria" or "fiaschetteria", the typical home-style restaurant, to taste the true Roman cuisine in a popular and cheerful atmosphere (for an overview of Roman cuisine see the article in our BLOG).

The Colosseum

DAY 2 – vatican city

On the other side of River Tevere, head for the Vatican hill, home of the tiny state of Vatican City. Here stands the immense St. Peter’s Basilica, dominating the extraordinary Piazza framed by the magnificent four column-deep colonnades designed by Gian Lorenzo Bernini. The Basilica itself is an extraordinary casket for some of the most beautiful works of art in the world, such as Michelangelo’s “La Pietà” and Bernini’s “Baldacchino”, along with works of the most important artists of the Renaissance, from Raphael to Canova.

Inside the Vatican Museums, you will be astonished by the exquisite and unique Sistine Chapel, the “Sancta Sanctorum” of the Roman Catholic Church, where cardinals gather to elect the new Pope! The Sistine Chapel takes its name from Pope Sixtus IV della Rovere (pontiff from 1471 to 1484) who had the old Cappella Magna restored between 1477 and 1480. The decoration of the walls was executed by a team of painters, Pietro Perugino, Sandro Botticelli, Domenico Ghirlandaio and Cosimo Rosselli, assisted by their respective shops. Julius II della Rovere (pontiff from 1503 to 1513), the nephew of Sixtus IV, decided to partly alter the decoration, entrusting the work in 1508 to Michelangelo Buonarroti, who painted the Ceiling and, on the upper part of the walls, the lunettes. The nine central panels show the Stories of Genesis, from the Creation to the Fall of man, to the Flood and the subsequent rebirth of mankind with the family of Noah. Again, towards the end of 1533, Clement VII de' Medici (pontiff from 1523 to 1534) gave Michelangelo the task of painting the Last Judgement on the altar wall.

Vatican City: St. Peter's Basilica

DAY 3 – orvieto and civita

Today you will reach Orvieto in Umbria, one of the most interesting hill towns in Italy, perched up on a volcanic rock, its history dating back to the Etruscans.

Although just an hour from Rome, the architecture is different, with many of the buildings constructed out of “tufo”, a type of volcanic rock. Orvieto’s main attraction is its 14th-century Cathedral – a masterpiece of Gothic architecture with a glistening façade of stained glass, mosaics and sculptures. Another attraction is St. Patrick’s Well, a 62-meter-deep (203 feet) feat of engineering characterized by two spiral staircases that wind around the well (yet never meet), with 248 steps down to the water. A pleasant guided tour along a very easy route makes it possible to get to know Orvieto’s underground world, created by its ancient inhabitants over about 2,500 years of uninterrupted digging. A tour on a discovery of a millenary, surprising and unexpected “Underground City”, which you will surely enjoy!

At lunch don’t’ miss “salumi di cinghiale o cervo” (boar or deer sausage) and pecorino cheese and taste the region's prized white truffle oil, together with the delicious white wine of the area, Orvieto Classico!

Orvieto

Civita di Bagnoregio, the spectacular “borgo” slowly sliding towards the valley, is also known as the “Dying City”. The town is noted for its striking position atop a plateau of friable volcanic tuff overlooking the Tiber river valley. It is in constant danger of destruction as the edges of the plateau collapse due to erosion, leaving the buildings to crumble as their underlying support falls away.

Civita di Bagnoregio

DAY 4 - SPOLETO

Umbria is called “the green heart of Italy”, and its people are very proud of it. First, you will stop at an organic farm near Todi, where you will learn about organic cultivations and have a typical Umbrian lunch. Then you will stop in Spoleto, a medieval hill town in the Umbria region, famous for its summer music festival, “Festival dei Due Mondi”. Thick walls and a magnificent gorge surround the city and fine medieval and Roman monuments sit along the streets. The Duomo is one of Spoleto's finest sights: begun in the 12th century, the cathedral is set against a backdrop of hills and valleys. High above the town stand the Rocca, a Papal fortress which was used as a prison until the 1980s. A massive bridge, Ponte delle Torri, built in the 14th century, functioned as both a bridge and aqueduct; we can walk on it for breath-taking views of the valley and gorge below.

Spoleto, the beautiful staircase leading to the Duomo

At dinner, enjoy “salumi di cinghiale o cervo” (boar or deer sausage) and pecorino cheese, or taste the region's prized white truffle oil. Don’t forget to sip the Rubesco Riserva or the Sagrantino di Montefalco red wines.

DAY 5 – assisi & deruta

Today you will explore Assisi, the birthplace of St. Francis, the nobleman who renounced all his possessions to devote his life to helping the needy.

The splendid Basilica, one of the emblems of Christianity, located on Mount Subasio and overlooking the entire valley, is dedicated to him. Apart from being a strong appeal for millions of religious believers, the Basilica is a monument of great artistic value. The construction of the Basilica began two years after his death, in 1228, and between the end of the 13th and the beginning of the 14th century the basilica's walls were frescoed by the best artists of that time: Giotto, Cimabue, Simone Martini and Pietro Lorenzetti. St. Francis's Basilica consists of two churches laid upon each other and a crypt containing the tomb of the Saint.  The Lower Basilica, with a double front portal, presents a simple facade embellished with a rose window and a mosaic. The interior is decorated with frescoes by some of the most important painters from 1200 to 1300, from Cimabue to Giotto and from the Lorenzettis to Simone Martini.

In the Upper Basilica, it is possible to see the life cycle of St. Francis in frescoes painted by maestro Giotto, and the stories of the Old and New Testament covering the entire nave, and other wonderful frescoes by Cimabue and Torriti.

Another figure who has deeply influenced these places is Saint Clare, to whom the homonymous Basilica - presenting a facade made of white and pink stone and divided into three sections by horizontal cornices - is dedicated. The engaging interior frescoes and the remains of the Saint are visible through a window in the crypt. 

Assisi: St. Francis’ Basilica

Try to enjoy the mystical atmosphere of Assisi:

"Be praised, my Lord, through our sister Mother Earth,
Who feeds us and rules us,
And produces various fruits with coloured flowers and herbs."

(St. Francis, Prayer of the Canticle of the Creatures)

In the afternoon you will head for Deruta, famous for its splendid brightly coloured maiolica. Here you will visit a ceramics laboratory, to enjoy the colourful creations of ceramics master artisans.

Ceramics in Deruta

DAY 6 – val d’orcia

In these days you will explore Val d’Orcia, one of the most fascinating places in Italy, included by UNESCO in the list of World Heritage Sites. The landscape of Val d’Orcia is part of the agricultural hinterland of Siena, redrawn and developed when it was integrated into the territory of the city-state in the 14th and 15th centuries to reflect an idealized model of good governance and to create an aesthetically pleasing picture. The landscape’s distinctive aesthetics, flat chalk plains out of which rise almost conical hills with fortified settlements on top, inspired many artists. Their images have come to exemplify the beauty of well-managed Renaissance agricultural landscapes. 

First, you will stop in Montalcino, one of the prettiest hill towns in Tuscany. Around the village, rows of olive-trees and precious grapevines and the yellow fields create an enchanting landscape. And remember that the dry wine Brunello di Montalcino is probably the best Italian red, so you are not going to miss a taste at one of the most celebrated wineries of the area!

Val d'Orcia

DAYs 7 & 8 – val d’orcia

Val d’Orcia is really a delight for the eyes and the palate. Your first stop will be Pienza, “Pio’s town”: here Pope Pius II decided to build the perfect palazzo for his papal court according to the project of an “Ideal City" drawn up by artists such as Piero della Francesca. From the loggia of the Palace, you will enjoy a breath-taking panorama of the landscape all around! Also, you’ll have the chance to try the typical Pecorino cheese of Pienza at a cheese laboratory in the area.

Then, you will relax in Bagno Vignoni, a tiny and charming village where the main square is a pool 49 meters long and 29 wide, from the bottom of which bubble up several hot springs whose therapeutic quality has been renowned since antiquity! All this creates such a pleasant sensation, it will be so hard to leave!

Bagno Vignoni in Val d’Orcia

DAY 9 – siena and san gimignano

In Siena, the city of the Palio, you will walk on the famous Piazza del Campo, the concave square where horses run twice a year in a dangerous race that symbolizes the city’s freedom (see article in our BLOG).

But, maybe, the thing that you are going to remember better is the colour of frontages and roofs, the renowned colour “Sienna”, a pigment first produced during the Renaissance, that makes the city lovely and warm. And don’t forget to taste the Senese sweets: “cantucci” (biscuits with toasted almonds), “ricciarelli” (soft biscuits with icing sugar), “panforte” (cake with fruit nuts and spices) and “cavallucci” (biscuits with honey, walnut, candied fruits and spices. Travellers who love dessert will be delighted!

Siena, Piazza del Campo on the day of the Palio

On the way to San Gimignano, you may stop for a coffee in Monteriggioni, the famous Senese fortress which guarded the boundary between the Senese Republic and the Florentine “Signoria”. A step back in the medieval times that will impress you. All around are Chianti vineyards and pasturelands, it’s amazing! The village can only evoke the Middle Ages with its 13th-century walls and 14 quadrilateral towers. Towers that Dante compared to the Giants of hell, in the time when this fortified site was an outpost of the Senese against the Florentines, passing several times from one to the other.

The fortified village of Monteriggioni

Later on, you will stroll along the roads of San Gimignano, also known as the "Medieval Manhattan", thanks to its very old and impressive 14 towers that dominate the town skyline. Originally the towers were 72, built by patrician families probably to demonstrate their wealth and power. Seven of San Gimignano's towers are around Piazza del Duomo, the tallest one is Torre Grossa, 54 meters high, dating back to 1298.

San Gimignano, the Towers

DAY 10 - Florence

Welcome to Florence, the symbol of the Italian Renaissance.

Despite its international fame and greatness, Florence is also a small city, whose history is interwoven with that of its passionate citizens for more than one thousand years.

In Piazza Duomo you will be astonished by the Duomo, with the incredible Brunelleschi’s cupola, a masterpiece of art and architecture whose building techniques building are still covered by a veil of mystery. Beside it, Giotto’s Campanile (Belltower) and the Baptistery, one of the oldest buildings in the city, with its famous bronze doors made by Pisano and Ghiberti in the 14th and 15th centuries. In Piazza della Signoria you will walk in the middle of bronze and marble masterpieces by Giambologna and Cellini inside the marvellous Loggia dei Lanzi, and will admire the imposing Palazzo Vecchio, one of the symbols of Florence and still the seat of government of the city. You may also spare some time to relax, visiting a typical market for shopping, strolling through the pedestrian streets of the city and crossing the oldest bridge in Florence, “Ponte Vecchio” (Old Bridge), rich of jewellery shops.

Your itinerary will include Galleria dell’Accademia, hosting Michelangelo's David, the most famous sculpture in the world! The David was uncovered and shown to the Florentines on September 8, 1504, and with its height of 4 meters, the impeccable physical features and the political significance that the iconography of David had taken over the previous century, left the Florentines of the time speechless and has done the same ever since with visitors from all over the world.

At lunch, enjoy “Panino con Lampredotto” in a typical Florentine market, while for dinner move to Oltrarno where Florentines like to dine. Here you may taste the simple yet unforgettable recipes of the Tuscan tradition, such as "Crostini", "Panzanella" and "Peposo". And remember, Florence is the home of "Fiorentina" steak! In case you are a vegetarian, don’t worry: Tuscan cuisine offers tasty alternatives like “Pappa al Pomodoro” or “Ribollita” (for an overview of Tuscan cuisine see the article in our BLOG).

Florence: Santa Maria del Fiore with Brunelleschi’s Dome and Giotto’s Bell Tower

Florence is also the main Italian centre for the production of high-quality leather goods. The Florentine artisans are so famous that many fashion brands have opened their factories in the city or close to it, due to the high skill of the artisans involved and to the continuous inspiration that designers take from the town’s masterpieces. The area around Piazza Santa Croce is full of leather shops and workshops.

Thanks to the tradition of Tuscan tanneries, there is no better place to find shoes for all tastes than Florence: from the creations, designed and produced by hand by skilled craftsmen, to the large collections available in stores, renewed every season. Above all, for refinement and elegance, Ferragamo (also worth seeing the museum), Gucci and Prada. If you prefer a simpler style, across the river Arno there are many shops specialized in handmade shoes and sandals.

DAY 11 – pisa

On your way to Cinque Terre you will stop in Pisa, the beautiful Tuscan town famous all over the world for its “Torre Pendente” (Leaning Tower).

Piazza dei Miracoli, set over an ample greenfield, hosts four whiter-than-white masterpieces of grandiose Medieval art: the renowned Leaning Tower (also the Bell Tower), the Camposanto (or graveyard), the  Baptristy and the Cathedral itself. These last two are so unique that their creation gave origin to a new style, "Pisan Romanesque". 

This area was chosen to construct the Duomo of Santa Maria Assunta exactly for its centrality; founded in 1064, it was intended to celebrate the grandeur of Pisa during the Marine Republic’s epoch of power. "The temple of marble white as the snow" is how the structure is described on the gravestone of its architect, Buscheto di Giovanni Giudice. Consisting of five naves with its transept divided into three naves, it is surmounted by a splendid dome encircled by a loggia. The Duomo’s façade and exterior lateral sections feature elaborate decoration in marble (which can also be seen on its interior), mosaics, and bronze.  

In front of the Cathedral stands the Baptistry, also in a particular version of the Romanesque style. Initiated in 1152 by Diotisalvi, the Baptistry was finally completed in the 14th century; at that point, Gothic elements were also added. Of cylindrical form and circled by arcades of columns, this structure in white marble even boasts amazing acoustics. 

The Camposanto closes the northern end of the piazza in which the complex lies. This monumental cemetery, begun in 1278, is bordered by a fence of marble and houses a cloister at its centre. The majority of the frescoes that once coloured its walls were, unfortunately, destroyed in a fire in 1944 during the battle for Pisa.

Ultimately, the real symbol of Pisa is the Campanile, that is the Leaning Tower, that completes the image of this city. Because of land sinkage beneath it, the Tower stands at a significant incline – this sinkage impeded its very construction to a great extent. It was started in 1173, taken up again in 1275, and not completed until the second half of the 1300s. In cylindrical form, its lower part is done in blind arcades that then mutate into six floors of loggias, repeating motifs from the Duomo. Inside, a spiral staircase of 294 steps leads to the heights of one of the most famous towers in the world, where the lovely belfry and a spectacular view of the surrounding landscape await.

Pisa, Campo dei Miracoli

DAYs 12 & 13 – cinque terre

Welcome to Cinque Terre, the beautiful villages on the Ligurian Sea included in the UNESCO World Heritage Site list. You will be stunned by the sea views and the contrasts between the sea and the cliffside. From Monterosso, by train or on foot you may reach the other fishing villages: Corniglia, Vernazza, Manarola and Riomaggiore. The vineyards, typical of this area, contribute to creating a unique landscape with dry-laid stone walls, winding paths, enchanting beaches between cliffs and clear waters!

The area is divided into 5 seaside and agricultural villages enriched with colours, simplicity and charm. The first stop in the Cinque Terre is Monterosso, a well-known tourist destination embellished with elegant villas and a large beach. The old town centre, whose narrow alleys clamber up the hill, is home to the Gothic parish church of San Giovanni Battista and the 17th-century church of San Francesco, which is connected to the convent of the Capuchins.

Next is Vernazza and its charming marina, which is surrounded by the medieval little town and its characteristic little piazza, two Genoese lookout towers and the enchanting Gothic two-storey church dedicated to Santa Margherita d’Antiochia.

 Just a short distance away is Corniglia, a village perched on the ridge of a promontory and connected to the beach by a stairway with 365 steps. This town - which is traditionally dedicated to vineyard cultivation - offers visitors a marvellous view.

The enormous black cliff overlooking the sea and home to Manarola - which is known for wine and oil production -  with its colourful houses seemingly coming out of the rock also makes a big impact. 

The last town in the Cinque Terre, and heart of the homonymous park, is Riomaggiore, a picturesque fishing village with tall, narrow, pastel-coloured houses and alternating light and darkness coming from the tight alleyways.

You are in Liguria, so you will not miss Linguine with the real “Pesto Genovese” because only here you can find the original ingredients, basil in particular (if you want know more about Pesto, see article in our BLOG). If you like anchovies, you will not miss the local “acciughe”, they are a speciality of Monterosso! And what about Ligurian wines? Sciachetrà will seduce you!!

The village of Manarola in 5 Terre

DAY 14 - parma

Parma is known for its delicious food products. First, you will visit a Parmigiano Reggiano factory, where you will see cheese masters at work: a very special way to get into the production culture of the area and to discover how a true gastronomic gem is made! (see article in our BLOG).

Later on, time for a visit to a Parma ham factory, where you will learn the secrets of the most delicious ham, Prosciutto di Parma (see article in our BLOG).

And finally, you will savour authentic Italian cuisine on a fun-filled cooking class led by a local “rezdora” (a female cook in Parmesan language). Immerse yourself into the tradition of fresh Italian pasta and study the secrets of preparing pasta dough from scratch, using just flour and eggs. You will make your own “Tortelli d'erbetta” (Parma most traditional pasta with a filling of ricotta cheese and chards) and delicious tagliatelle with tomato sauce – all local ingredients! Once your amazing meal is ready, you will enjoy what you prepared matched with a glass of local Lambrusco wine. 

Parma Ham factory

DAY 15 - milan

Milan is first of all the Fashion Capital of Italy! The showrooms of all Italian manufacturers are located in the city and here buyers from worldwide distribution find the one and only “Italian Style”! But Milan is not only fashion, it is also and above all art, beauty and culture! Piazza del Duomo is the geographical and historical centre of the city. It is surrounded by palaces with arcades; in the middle, you can see the Duomo, one of Europe’s biggest Gothic cathedrals, whose construction started in the 14th and ended in the 20th century. And on the Gran Guglia, the cathedral’s highest spire, the Madonnina, a symbol of Milan, stands. To the left of the cathedral lies the 19th century Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II, a covered passageway in a Latin cross shape linking the grand Piazza del Duomo with Piazza della Scala, featuring mosaics and a wrought iron and glass roof.

You may also visit “Castello Sforzesco”, the Sforza Castle, a summary in stone of the political, military and artistic history of Milan. Then stroll down the streets of “Quadrilatero D’Oro”, the heart of the fashion industry, admiring the shop windows of Prada, Armani, Versace, Ferragamo, Dolce & Gabbana and Valentino. And in late afternoon taste a gorgeous Cappuccino at Pasticceria Cova, as locals often do in via Montenapoleone, “Montenapo” for the Milanese!

At dinner, what about a tasty yellow “Risotto alla Milanese”? According to an ancient tradition, the Duomo is where Risotto alla Milanese was “born”, invented by a boy who worked for the stained glass artist Valerio di Fiandra, nicknamed “Zafferano” for its habit of adding spices to his colours. One day he put some saffron in the rice as well and the result was a great success!

Milan, Piazza del Duomo

DAY 16 – lake como

The magnificent scenery of Lake Como (also known as “Lario”) has enchanted artists and travellers for centuries: from French novelist Flaubert to musicians of the calibre of Gioacchino Rossini, Giuseppe Verdi, and Vincenzo Bellini; it was here that he composed his opera Norma. Today Lake Como continues to attract members of the international jet-set and celebrities that appreciate the evocative beauty of the Lake and its surroundings. 

The Lake (one of Lombardy's several incomparable lakes) is of a characteristic upside-down Y-form. The town of Como is situated on its southwestern arm, Lecco on the southeastern arm, and Colico on that northern. From the Lake’s shores, one can enjoy multiple, fascinating views: suggestive “borghi”, splendid villas and lush gardens await visitors in search of a little charm and relaxation, or a little culture and contact with nature. 

Breathtaking villas, one after the other, encircle the lake, a resort destination of the nobles of Lombardy since the 16th Century. Cernobbio is the site of Villa d’Este (1600s), location in Alfred Hitchcock’s celebrated film The Pleasure Garden; and the celebrated Villa Erba, one of the most important Italian lake villas from the 1800s - today it is an internationally-known convention and expository complex. In the nearby Comunes of Moltrasio and Lenno, Passalacqua and Villa Balbianello (used in films such as “Star Wars: Episode II” and James Bond’s “Casino Royale”) are important touristic attractions.  

Along the coast is Tremezzo, famous for its Villa Carlotta, with terrace gardens and a museum boasting works by Canova, Thorvaldsen, and Hayez. It was built in the 17th century for a powerful Milanese family and in the second half of the 19th century, Princess Marianne of Nassau bought the villa and gave it to her daughter Carlotta as a wedding present, hence the name. Her husband was a keen botanist and over the years turned it into the lush garden that we see here today.

Where the Lake’s three arms meet, you may visit Bellagio and Villa Melzi. The Villa, built in 1808, is much sought-after for its botanical park, with sculptures and garden renowned for its beautiful azaleas and rhododendrons.

Villa Melzi in Bellagio

DAY 17 - verona

In a stretch of land designed in accord with the bends and twists of the River Adige, we find Verona, a visually-stunning city of excellence.

It is really a city of many faces whose history can also summarize Italy's history – think of the works left by the Romans, the Medieval streets and the “palazzi” of the Renaissance.

The city’s commercial hub is Piazza delle Erbe, where the original Roman Forum was located. This piazza represents the synthesis of several different historic moments; such is affirmed by the 13th-century buildings – among which Casa dei Mercanti (House of Merchants) stands out - the painted facades of the Mazzanti Houses, and the Madonna Verona Fountain, with its central statue from the Roman Epoch. Also dating back to Roman times is the monument that is most symbolic of Verona, its Arena (1st century B.C.). Originally constructed to host gladiator combats, it saw a long period of abandonment before it returned to the limelight with a new form of entertainment, in 1913: after having hosted the premiere of Aida in that year, it has been known around the world for the sounds of opera that emanate from its stage, in addition to hosting concerts and theatre performances.

Then, Romanesque Verona lies in its imposing Duomo, as well as in the Cathedral of St. Zeno, and in Castelvecchio, which looks out from the banks of the Adige; it symbolizes the Medieval power of the Scaliger family, to whom the realization of the crenellated Scaliger Bridge is attributed.

The palazzi of Verona narrate its long history of wealth and power. In Piazza dei Signori - which sits under the dominating Lamberti Towers - the portico of the Loggia del Consiglio catches the eye; it is here where 16th-century political life took place, while the Palazzo di Cansignorio and Palazzo del Comune (or “della Ragione”) were the seats of military, judicial and administrative power. Nearby lie the Scaliger Arches, in the same-named piazza, and some of the most suggestive views of the city, including glimpses of the monumental tombs of the Lords of Verona. 

Finally, the Verona of Shakespeare and the “star-crossed lovers” is a legend all over the world and lives indefinitely through the places made famous in the play, Romeo and Juliet. Yet the original literary work was created by Luigi da Porto, a writer from Vicenza, in the 1500s; it eventually circulated Europe, reaching England. It was the Bard who rendered it the immortal story that it is today, allowing Verona to rest as one of the most admired and visited places in the world.

And finally, remember: Verona is a very elegant city, famous for its classy shops!

A few kilometres west of Verona, in a landscape of valleys and hills descending from the mountains to the plains around the Adige, Valpolicella hosts the vineyards supplying the grapes for two of the greatest red wines of Italy: Recioto and Amarone. The starting point for both wines is the same: ripe and high-quality grapes, which are harvested and stored in the "fruttai", well ventilated and dry places, where they are left to dry for 100 - 120 days. Grapes with their thick skin lose water and sugars concentrate. After crushing, fermentation takes place, shorter for the Recioto, to leave a high percentage of sugars, longer for the Amarone. Two wines for connoisseurs, which you can enjoy in one of the most beautiful wineries in the area.

Verona: the Arena

DAYs 18 & 19 – stra’ and terme EUganee

Today you will drive to the area of the Brenta river, a direct waterway connecting the Venetian Lagoon with Padua. The two shores of the river are still enlivened by many attractive sites, like fancy villas, small towns and green areas.

As you approach the small town of Strà you’ll see a long wall with wrought iron gates and a neoclassic-style façade. Here you are in Villa Pisani, once the luxury dwelling of the Pisani, one of the most powerful Venetian families in the 18th century. The building of Villa Pisani consisted of 114 rooms, in honour of Alvise, the 114th Doge of Venice, and the most celebrated Venetian painters were commissioned to decorate the interiors. Also, the park is worth visiting for a pleasant walk through the Labyrinth, the elegant Coffee House, the original Stables and the 20th-century straight basin.

Villa Pisani

Now, it’s time to relax in Abano Terme, a renowned thermal town close to Venice, where you will enjoy spa sessions and absorb the therapeutic qualities of hot water coming from natural springs.

DAYs 20 & 21 - venice

Welcome to the “unique” Venice, the “city on the lagoon”! You will be astonished by its beauty and charm!

You may start your visit with Piazza San Marco (St. Mark’s Square) and the interior of the Basilica, a 900 years old marvel of architecture! Near St. Mark’s Basilica is Palazzo Ducale, the most impressive secular building in Venice and once the official residence of the supreme authority of Venice, the “Doge”. A masterpiece of Gothic architecture, the Doge’s Palace is an impressive structure composed of layers of building elements and ornamentation, from its 14th and 15th century original foundations to the significant Renaissance and opulent Mannerist adjunctions.

At lunch, you may relax by tasting wine and savouring delicious ”cicheti,” (finger food). There is tremendous variety, and options include anything from simple cheese or salami to almost any kind of seafood, fried and grilled vegetables, sweet and sour sardines, creamy codfish and much, much more!

Then you may visit Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari (Saint Mary’s of Friars), striking for its huge size and the quality of its works of art, including masterpieces by Titian, Giovanni Bellini and Donatello, and several grandiose tombs. Also, explore the streets and savour everyday life in an intricate maze of ancient narrow alleyways, lively squares with magnificent buildings and meandering canals, and finally walk on the Rialto Bridge, the busy "heart" of Venice. And last but not least, you may enjoy a Gondola ride on the city’s canals: a jump back in time, when Venetians moved only on the water.

Knowing what should be bought in Venice is not easy, as it is one of the most beautiful Italian cities. Rich in traditions, Venice presents a wide selection of souvenirs to take home as a souvenir of your trip. What you cannot miss among your purchases are the typical Venetian masks. The cost of the original ones is quite high, but it is really worth it! Another thing that should be bought in Venice is craftsmanship, appreciated worldwide. In the city of Italian carnival, it is a must to buy a Murano glass object. Each product is worked and painted by hand, but be sure you buy an original product from Murano, guaranteed by a label or a signature (and also by the seller), and not a Chinese copy!

If you do not have enough of the shopping, you can leap to the markets. The best known is the fruit and vegetable market of Rialto, which extends to the fish market. Here you can buy fresh products breathing a typically Venetian atmosphere. Those who love sweets can go to a bakery and buy the famous Carnival “fritole”, “baicoli” or “spuncioti de caramel”.

On your second day in Venice, you will enjoy an excursion to the main islands of the Venetian Lagoon: Murano and Burano. The first stop on your visit will be Murano, known throughout the world for its ancient tradition of glass making. The stop will include an optional visit to a glass factory with a demonstration of the art of glass blowing. The excursion will continue to the Venice island of Burano, the bustling island famous for its colourful houses and the hand-crafted lacework, true works of art made of lace that can be purchased at local shops or street stalls.

Finally, at dinner you will be delighted by the flavours of the regional cuisine of Veneto, boasting delicious recipes such as“Sarde in saor”, Risotto with seafood, the typical “Baccala' mantecato”, to finish with a fantastic “Bussolà” (for an overview of the regional cuisine of Veneto see the article in our BLOG).

Venice, masks at Punta della Dogana

Day 22 - CASTEL DEL MONTE

Before getting to Alberobello, you will not miss the massive fortress of Castel Del Monte.

Recognized as a World Heritage Site in 1996, Castel del Monte is a brilliant example of medieval architecture, located on a hill in the Murge area. Commissioned by the eclectic and cultured Frederick II, Duke of Swabia, the Castle is an exceptional work for the perfection of its forms and the fusion of cultural elements from different periods and places. The Lions placed at the monumental entrance are typical of Romanesque art, while the friezes that decorate some parts of the castle belie Classical inspiration. And the floor's design and materials are in part reminiscent of Islamic art. It is interesting to know that the number 8 is the principal factor in the castle's plan: 8 are the sides of the castle's plan, 8 are the rooms of the ground floor and first floor arranged to form an octagon, and the same goes for the massive octagonal towers. 

Castel del Monte

It is still not clear what led Frederick II to build this brilliant piece of architecture. An air of mystery surrounds it and is thus the fount of many legends and the charm of this unique place. 

DAY 23 ALBEROBELLO

The Trulli of Alberobello are famous worldwide for their beauty and unique characteristics and represent one of the most extraordinary examples of Italian folk architecture. They were built in a particular historical period when the construction of stable dwellings was highly-taxed; the inhabitants of the region thus boasted a great capacity to adapt and an exceptional cleverness in coming up with the Trulli, temporary houses built with the local stone. From precariousness to stability - the process of transformation and recovery, and the deference to the originality of the work earned the Trulli of Alberobello their recognition as a World Heritage Site.  

In Alberobello, the capital of the Trulli, each Trullo is of different shape and size. Unique constructions, they are sometimes combined in a complex of communicating houses, while others are built on two levels. Most of them feature a grey cone-shaped roof that ends with a sphere or hemisphere shape. The interior, arranged as a single chamber, is constituted niches for a fireplace, bed and various furniture. The structure assures excellent indoor climate control: cool in summer and warm in winter! 

The Trulli of Alberobello

DAY 24 - Lecce

Lying on a plain at the foot of the Salento Plateau is Lecce - the "Florence of the South" - one of the most interesting cities in the region for its architecture, typical of the 17th century.

Of ancient origins, the city experienced two distinct periods of prosperity in its history: the Roman era and that of the rule of the Kingdom of Naples. Under both, construction of buildings, monuments and mansions increased heavily. These new structures were characterized by magnificent and rich ornamentations that earned this typical architecture the definition of “Leccese Baroque". The imaginative and meticulous sculpting work was facilitated by the use of local stone, flexible and easy to inlay.  A visit to Lecce can begin with Piazza Duomo, once used as a fortress and today considered the most elegant "salon" in the city. The grandeur of the Duomo, work of Zimbalo, Cino and Penna, the five-story-tall bell tower, the Palazzo Vescovile (Bishop's Palace) and the Palazzo del Seminario (Seminary) mark the perimeter of the square, one of the monumental works that best represent the magnificence of Lecce’s style.

Lecce, the Florence of the South

Not far away, Piazza Sant'Oronzo narrates the city's entire history. The Roman period is visible in the ruins of the Amphitheatre that becomes the exceptional stage for theatrical performances in the summertime, and in part by the high Column - on which stands a bronze of St. Orontius, depicted in the act of blessing - erected in the 17th Century utilizing some of the Roman columns positioned on the Ancient Appian Way. Symbol of the Renaissance is Palazzo del Seggio, known as the "Seat," which today hosts important art exhibitions, and the Church of Santa Maria delle Grazie, with its interesting frescoes and works sculpted in wood.

Not to be missed is a visit to the Basilica di Santa Croce, where the inspiration of master masonry is visible in every part of the monumental façade that anticipates the beauty of its interior, a harmonious balance between the sobriety of the classical style and the splendour of Lecce's Baroque. 

DAY 25 - matera

Matera is one of the oldest cities in the world, whose territory holds evidence of human settlements starting from the Paleolithic and without interruption until today. Touring Matera is like experiencing a forgotten past - you feel as though you are setting foot in a nativity scene when you visit this charming city in Lucania. It’s no coincidence it’s referred to as “the second Bethlehem” and was the setting for Mel Gibson’s movie “The Passion”. 

Matera is widely known as the city of the “Sassi”, the original urban nucleus, developed from the natural caves carved into the rock and subsequently modelled in increasingly complex structures. It is at the centre of an incredible rock landscape that preserves a great heritage of culture and traditions and is home to exhibitions of great national and international prestige.

In the 1950s, when the inhabitants who lived in the grottos dug out of the mountain were forced to abandon those dwellings to settle in modern districts, no one would have ever thought that those grottos - the Sassi - would have become the symbol of a reborn city. UNESCO added the Sassi of Matera to its list of World Heritage Sites in 1993, as a whole and millennial way of life to be preserved and handed down to our descendants. It was recognized as a model for living harmoniously with the environment while integrating with it and taking advantage of resources without disturbing the environment.

Matera, the city of Sassi

Geologists call it calcarenite and common folk refer to it as tuff: it’s the rock surrounding Matera that this land’s master craftsmen learned to work with in ancient times. This friable, adaptable material is abundant in the mountain that dominates the city, so it seemed only natural for the people from Matera to go up there and dig out that rock to build a home in it. The material that was extracted was processed to make the façade of the dwelling. After the first home, others were built until there was a network of houses, tunnels and alleyways passing over and in each other to become that magic place called Sassi - a gigantic sculpture, a miracle of town planning!

Sleeping in a real cave carved centuries ago will take you back in time, you will remember it forever and Matera will always be in your heart!

DAY 26 - PAESTUM

Located in the South-East of the Gulf of Salerno, Paestum is an archaeological site of extreme importance, recognised by UNESCO as part of the World Cultural Heritage. Built by the Greeks around the 7th century BC with the name of Poseidon, the city was later occupied by Romans who made it a thriving colony, giving it its current name. 

In addition to the cultural value, the importance of Paestum is linked to the excellent state of conservation of properties starting from its walls, built by the Greeks and later strengthened by the Romans. The most striking thing is represented by the view of three majestic temples located in a green plain, which reflects a different light, depending on the hours and seasons. Many writers, poets and artists like Goethe, Shelley, Canova and Piranesi were fascinated by this sight, that later became their inspiration. 

The Greek Temples of Paestum

These large buildings are a remarkable example of Doric style architecture. The Temple of Hera, dating to the 6th century BC, is the most ancient building. The Temple of Neptune (5th century BC) is a huge construction made of travertine marble, in a warm golden colour that varies at different times of the day. The Temple of Ceres (6th century BC), actually dedicated to the goddess Athena, back in the Medieval times was transformed into a church.

Paestum is popular not only for its temples but also for a gourmet speciality which you should taste on site: its “mozzarella di bufala”. Made with the best buffalo milk from the area, “mozzarella di bufala” is closely linked to the land of Campania, the dexterity with which it is made reflects the love that the cheesemakers put to create this Italian excellence. We will visit a cheese factory in the area, to understand how it is created and taste it freshly made, an unforgettable experience!

DAY 27 – amalfi coast

Welcome to the Amalfi Coast!

Costiera Amalfitana is widely considered Italy's most scenic stretch of coastline, a landscape of pastel-coloured villages terraced into hillsides, steep panoramic roads, luxuriant gardens and enchanting vistas over turquoise waters and green mountains. Considered by UNESCO "an outstanding example of a Mediterranean landscape, with exceptional cultural and natural scenic values," the coast is a World Heritage Site since 1997. You may go from town to town at the discovery of Amalfi, Positano, and Ravello, three of the most beautiful villages in Southern Italy, world-famous for their charm and colourful architecture.

Amalfi has a typically Mediterranean architecture, made up of lanes and characteristic white houses piled one upon the other. In the Middle Ages, it was one of Italy's four powerful maritime republics (with Venice, Pisa, and Genoa). All sea trade in the Mediterranean was once governed by the 12th century “Tavole Amalfitane”, one of the world's oldest maritime codes. A must-see in Amalfi is the Duomo di Sant'Andrea, fronted by an intricately patterned façade, redone in the 19th century. Founded in the 9th century, the cathedral's subsequent alterations have spared its principal glory, the main portal's 11th century Byzantine bronze doors. Next to the church lies the Chiostro del Paradiso (1268), or Cloister of Paradise, whose serious Romanesque tone is enlivened by the Arab elements in its sinuous columns. To escape the bustle of Amalfi, take the popular walk along the “Valle dei Mulini”, a steep-sided valley dotted with ruined watermills – “i mulini” - once used to make paper, an industry for which Amalfi was, and still is, famous.

Positano sits in a splendid panoramic position on one of the most beautiful stretches of coastline. Its enchanting town centre of delightful pastel-coloured houses surrounds the parish church of Santa Maria Assunta; its streets are lined with quaint, colourful shops and its numerous beaches are world-famous.

Ravello is situated in a more elevated position than the other pearls of the Amalfi Coast, boasting exceptional views of the coast and its marvellous villas and gardens which, according to French novelist André Gide, are “closer to the sky than the sea”. Here you may visit Villa Rufolo, built in the 13th century, which hosted popes and kings, as well as Richard Wagner, who composed part of his opera Parsifal here in 1880. Views from its idyllic gardens are magnificent!

A trip to Cetara is an absolute must. The village is renowned for a particular gourmet speciality, “colatura di alici” (anchovy sauce), which has been produced according to an ancient procedure for generations. Spaghetti with colatura di alici is the typical recipe of the place, a dish which you will remember forever (see  article in our BLOG).

At dinner, don’t miss Spaghetti with clams in olive oil and garlic sauce, or Seafood Risotto, with a glass of excellent Greco di Tufo white wine.

Amalfi Coast

DAY 28 - capri

An island offering a landscape of wild beauty sculpted by wind, sea and the hand of man, this is Capri.  With a precipitous, jagged coast, and encircled by the famous “Faraglioni” (sea stacks), enormous and uniquely-shaped boulders, and by numerous caves that tell of evocative plays of light. The most famous of these caves is the “Grotta Azzurra” (Blue Grotto), closely connected to the history of tourism in Capri. 

Its discovery by the ancient Romans is hinted at by countless archaeological finds - e.g.  Villa Jovis, whose construction was commissioned by Emperor Tiberius.

The island continues to be both a legend and a favourite destination for travellers, intellectuals and the international jet-set - "performing" at any given time in the legendary “Piazzetta”, the real-time theatre of the island's 'Dolce Vita'. Beyond the cultural attractions and sea and nature in all their charm, Capri also offers good shopping: tasteful boutiques and artisans' studios selling “Made in Italy” items and typical products alternate along the characteristic sidestreets and alleyways. Moreover, the exuberantly-flavoured local food is tied to the island's maritime and peasant traditions. 

The Faraglioni in Capri

DAY 29 - pompei

Today you will visit Pompeii, the Roman city excavated from the ashes of the Vesuvius, a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1997!

In 62 A.D. Pompei was partially destroyed by an earthquake, and as its reconstruction was still ongoing, on August 24, 79 A.D. the eruption of Vesuvius covered the city and its suburban villas with a thick layer of stones, ashes and lapilli (thick, glassy lava). Herculaneum, on the other hand, disappeared beneath a flood of volcanic mud. 

The ruins of the ancient Roman cities offer an unparalleled window into the quotidian life of classical antiquity.  Here you can understand how the Romans of the 1st century AD lived: from the brothels and lavatories to the posh dining rooms and the bathing establishments which included modern spas, health clubs and gym. The eruption of Mount Vesuvius destroyed the town in 79 AD and more than 3,000 people were covered by the debris from the volcano.

Due to its healthy climate and pleasant scenery, Pompeii was a holiday resort for rich Romans. It is now famous for its civic buildings lining the streets that are still intact today. Some of these include the Surgeon’s House, as well as those of the Faun and the Chaste Lovers, which are exceptional examples of the epoch’s architecture. Another remarkable construction is the House of Mysteries, which derives its name from the murals depicting the initiation rites (i.e., the mysteries) of the Dionysian cult. A peculiar characteristic of Pompeii is the florid graffiti covering the walls in just about every building; this is because when the volcanic eruption happened, Pompeii was set to carry out elections in the days ahead – hence the writings and ideograms, which feature both political and sexual content. 

Pompei: Casa del Fauno

DAY 30 - CASTELLI ROMANI

The area south of Rome is known as “Castelli Romani” (Roman Castles). The entire area originated from a series of volcanic eruptions that shook an original crater, creating some lakes. The area, a traditional destination for the out-of-town excursions of the Romans, is dotted with several pretty hill towns famous for their ancient history and highly regarded wine: Castelgandolfo, the summer residence of the pope, Rocca di Papa and Grottaferrata, known for their culture and gastronomic delicacies, Frascati, popular for its breathtaking views and its sweet and refreshing white wine named after the city, are only some of them.

Castelli romani

The tour is over, but the memories of a fantastic journey will accompany you for a lifetime!

Arrivederci for another tour with VITOR, Visit Italy on the Road.

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Message from the CEO
Dear all,
in these very difficult days for all of us, for Italy and the whole world, we hope that you, your families and your loved ones are well and are making the most of your time.
It feels like the entire world right now is on edge. It seems like the world has paralyzed, our lives have suddenly changed, it’s so difficult to adapt to a new reality, some people we know are leaving us forever.
There is also a lot of fear about what will happen. No one can make predictions.
But there is a beginning and an end to everything.
There are thousands of doctors, researchers and scientists who are working on a solution.
We are reacting with strength, determination and cohesion without forgetting our deep humanity, joy and creativity. Human beings have already overcome difficult times like this, so we must look ahead and keep on living. In this period let’s try to do things we have never done, to rediscover our families, our loved ones and friendships. Let’s use this period to improve ourselves internally, to think about the gift of our lives, to love, to embrace, to smile, to tell each other things that we would never have said.
To our friends who like travelling and exploring….
It's very difficult to be world travelers stuck at home. We must stop and get through this exceptional chapter safely, and we miss travelling. But please, keep on dreaming, with the same positivity, passion, curiosity you had before. On our side, we are here at work with the same passion and professionalism, with the same desire to continue to share emotions, stories, projects with our friends. We are working for a tomorrow made of new services and new ideas, to make your travels even more pleasant, more comfortable and more intense. It is a new challenge, which we never expected to face but, with your help, we will start again, stronger than before and always close to you.
And soon the time will come when once again we will swim together in our beautiful lakes and seas, walk together in our cities, cook together in our kitchens, eat together at our trattorias, sip together a glass of wine at our cellars.
Until then, I want to thank you for your support and understanding. Take care of yourself, we can't wait to give you a warm welcome back to our fantastic country.
Grazie e ciao,


Marcello Cordovani
Founder and CEO